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Ranch/Rambler Homes

 Ranch Homes/ Rambler A Ranch Style home is an American original. Originating in the 1920’s with the post war boom of the middle class, this architectural style home fused modernist ideas with the American Western period of wide open spaces to create a casual lifestyle. One story living with a long low pitch roof and deep overhanging eaves. The roof line was primarily cross gabled, single gable or hip. The home itself was either rectangular, L or U Shaped. Many had an attached garage, others none at all. The floor plan was simple with the living area separate from the bedrooms. Often times a sliding glass door leads to a patio and feature large glass windows. The exterior materials used where typically locally sourced and mixed such as stucco, brick, wood or stone. By the 1950’s, nine in every 10 homes built were a Ranch or Rambler style. By the late 20th Century the Ranch style home began to wane and Neo-Eclectic homes became the rage with their combination of the Cape Cod, Mission, T

Mold: A Four Letter Word

Mold is around all of us. Anywhere there is moisture, mold can grow and when it does, it can grow very quickly. So what can you do to deal with it before it gets out of hand?

Control Moisture:

Moisture is an ideal breeding ground for mold. With a little home maintenance you can keep it at bay. Good ventilation can be achieve by installing exhaust fans, especially in the kitchen and bathroom. Keep humidity below 40% and make sure damp area of your home are exposed to dry heat and air movement. Place a dehumidifier in your basement to reduce dampness and moisture levels.

I See a Brown Spot!

Mildew can easily be identified as a patch of discoloration on the ceiling, floor or wall. This is easily treatable with bleach, water and a scrub bush. After cleaning, allow to completely dry. If the wall is soaked and fuzzy mold is growing though there may be a larger issue at bay. It is imperative to find the source of the problem. It could be a leaky pipe or a hole in the roof, the moisture source should be fixed immediately.  If the sheetrock has been completely saturated it will need to be replaced completely or cut out and discarded.

What To Remember:

Be proactive. Nothing is worse than letting something sit there wet. Like a wet bathing suit against your skin too long... yep. Yuck.

Leigh Ann Fisher
Licensed in Virginia


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