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It's Showtime! What To Do and What Not To Do

The sign is up and you are ready to show your home off! In any market, a hot one or not, you need to have your house prepared to show as soon as you are live! What should you do and not do for a showing?

Upgrades and Repairs:

If your home has undergone some major changes since you purchased your home, you may want to list these out. Many people will never even look at these but if they are interested they will. Upgrading your brass knobs on your kitchen is not a big deal to the buyer,but a new furnace, hot water heater or brand new roof is. Any transferable warranty should also be noted.

The list doesn't have to be long as I've stated, most people will not even notice it unless they do and if they do, they are not going to read a long list. A simple record is fine. If a professional was called in to do work, show receipts.

Neighborhood Info:

Not everyone looking at your home is familiar with the area. Show off your neighborhood with any information you have such as if there is …

How Much Home Can I Afford?



How Much Home Can I Afford?

Figuring out how much you can afford or what your payment will be each month is one of the most asked questions I face as a Real Estate Agent. Picking up the phone and calling a lender you don't know can be scary. Looking at mortgage loan programs available can be confusing and understanding interest rates can be trying. 

There is an easy way to get started. 

Step One: Find out what the interest rates are at the current time. You can typically do this by searching on the internet or a quick call to a local lender. Get your rates on conventional fixed rate loans.

Step Two: To obtain the clearest picture of how much home you can actually qualify for, the best idea is to contact a reputable local lender and let them analyze your entire situation. 

This lender can calculate your income-to-debt ratio, do a quick credit score and give you the information you need. Typically, lenders like to see a ratio not exceeding about 28%. 

This does not take into consideration long term monthly debt. As an example, to qualify for a loan, lenders may require ratios of 28% or 36%. This means you can spend up to 28% of your gross monthly income on a mortgage payment, and no more than 36% of your gross monthly income on all forms of debt, mortgage included.

I work with a number of loan officers and can recommend one for you. Contact me from the sidebar! 

Thanks!

Leigh Ann 

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